What I Learned Migrating To Hugo

What I Learned Migrating To Hugo

When I first started this website over 10 years ago I decided to go with the “gold standard” of content management systems at the time: WordPress. Today WordPress still runs a huge amount of the internet with something like 60M websites and about a third of the top websites all using the platform. This means that there is a huge community around it with plenty of support… but it also means that it carries a pretty big target on its back as seen over the years with wide ranging security vulnerabilities and attacks.
Trying out .NET Core on Linux

Trying out .NET Core on Linux

Ever since the announcement of .NET Core I’ve been interesting in writing some C# code on my Linux desktop. Recently I found some time to actually try out Microsoft’s latest .NET Core release and actually get a program up and running. While there are plenty of guides out there I followed the official Microsoft Hello World tutorial here. I’ve included the steps I took and some other notes below mostly for my own reference later on.

Updates to my OpenPGP key

With my current OpenPGP key set to expire in the middle of December I’ve decided to extend its life by changing the expiry date for the primary signing key 0xFEEEFA8F and adding a new encryption subkey that can be used when the existing one expires. The new expiry date for the main signing key as well as the new encryption subkey is 2 years from today. Before getting into the actual notice allow me to capture exactly what I did:

Using rsync via the Windows Subsystem for Linux to backup a Windows computer

From the world of “why would anyone ever bother to do this?” comes a new approach to backing up your favourite Windows 10 computer! OK so why am I even doing this? I guess the answer to that question is really “just to see if I could.” It’s not the best answer but not everything needs a practical reason right? So how does one go about using the awesome rsync utility to perform a Windows backup?
A Fitbit Year in Review (2017)

A Fitbit Year in Review (2017)

Last year I wrote a post chronicling my first year wearing a Fitbit and I thought it was really interesting to see all of the stats it tracks. I decided I’d try to keep up this trend and post my stats from 2017 as well: 2,478,268 steps taken (down 684,633 from last year) Steps taken by week 4,189 floors climbed (down 1,999 from last year) Floors climbed by week

CoreGTK 3.22.0 Released!

The next version of CoreGTK, version 3.22.0, has been tagged for release! This is the first version of CoreGTK to support GTK+ 3.22. Highlights for this release: Rebased on GTK+ 3.22 New supported GtkWidgets in this release: GtkNativeDialog GtkShortcutsShortcut CoreGTK is an Objective-C language binding for the GTK+ widget toolkit. Like other “core” Objective-C libraries, CoreGTK is designed to be a thin wrapper. CoreGTK is free software, licensed under the GNU LGPL.

The Linux Experiment Post Roundup (October 2017)

Here are some of the recent posts from over at The Linux Experiment: Open Document Formats: A Successful Transition? Let your computer continue to boot even if it can’t mount something in fstab New look for The Linux Experiment! Optimizing your images New Tutorial Center More Housekeeping at The Linux Experiment Fixing error with Google Chrome public key Do you want to write for The Linux Experiment? Experimenting with Arch: The Installation Experimenting with Arch: Starting to Build the System I Want Linux DNS and DHCP Server KWLUG: FreeSWITCH, FusionPBX and Conference Calls (2017-08) Gentoo Linux review – Romancing the penguin Experimenting with Arch: Enabling the AUR Media Server Experimenting with Arch: Adding Laptop Goodies Gentoo makes Perl upgrades easy Experimenting with Arch: Playing some Pacman Load Balancing with Nginx Red Hat 7.

Open Document Formats: A Successful Transition?

Some Background Years ago I wrote about my interest in switching away from proprietary binary blob formats (primarily things like Microsoft .doc, .xls & .ppt formats) and instead move to their more open alternatives (OpenDocument .odt, .ods & .odp and Office Open XML .docx, .xlsx & .pptx). The genesis for this drive was an article by Vincent Cerf where he was talking about the problems around reading these proprietary formats in the future, when the original vendors are either out of business or no longer interested in supporting them.

Podcasts worth listening to (Part III)

Continuing on with the posts about some of the podcasts I think are were worth listening to… As before this is by no means an exhaustive list but I have some new additions that are worth pointing out. So again in no particular order here are some other podcasts I would recommend listening to: HI101 HI101 is more of a conversation about history than a lecture about it Description: Each month I sit down with a friend to discuss history not as a lecture, but as a conversation.
The Linux Experiment Post Roundup (July 2017)

The Linux Experiment Post Roundup (July 2017)

Here are some of the recent posts from over at The Linux Experiment: Alternative software: Vocal Podcast Client Do you want to write for The Linux Experiment? Stop screen tearing with Nvidia/Intel graphics combo Countdown to 2017! Blast from the Past: Open formats are… the best formats? Blast from the Past: A lengthy, detailed meta-analysis of studies of GNOME Do Enjoy some free audiobooks with LibriVox! Blast from the Past: How is it doing that?