SWT

Hash Verifier now on GitHub

I have taken the time to create a GitHub repository for my old Hash Verifier software which you can now find here. I’ve even created different releases to reflect the evolution of the software as found on this website. Hopefully this will make it even easier for you to check out and play around with. GitHub repository link: https://github.com/tylerburton/hashverifier Version 0.1.0.0 (Original post) Version 0.2.0.0 (Original post) Version 0.3.0.0 (Original post)

Hash Verifier 0.3.0.1 (Java Web Start)

Java Web Start is a technology that allows easy deployment of Java based software through a web browser. The advantages of this framework are numerous but one nice thing is that it allows you far more freedom then the completely sandboxed Java applet. In this post I will detail how I converted my Hash Verifier application to run right from the browser. Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) The javax.jnlp libraries provide the functionality needed to launch the application from within a web browser.

Introduction to SWT programming

Back in this previous post I mentioned the possibility of putting up a sort of how-to guide on SWT programming. Well I’ve finally found some time to do so. I will try to make this as step-by-step as possible so that anyone reading this will completely understand what I’m doing. What you’ll need I’m making the following assumptions before starting: That you’ve already installed the Java Development Kit (not just the Java Runtime) That you’ve installed Eclipse.
Hash Verifier 0.3.0.0 (A.K.A. the SWT re-write)

Hash Verifier 0.3.0.0 (A.K.A. the SWT re-write)

After reading up on how you can use SWT to give Java a more native look and feel I was interested in giving it a shot first hand. I decided to break out old faithful (Hash Verifier) and re-write it completely in Java/SWT. The end result was an application that has essentially equivalent functionality (see below for differences) but is completely cross-platform. No matter what operating system you end up running this on (Windows, Mac OSX, Linux) it should have a native look and feel.
Make Java GUIs less ugly (…or how I learned to love SWT)

Make Java GUIs less ugly (…or how I learned to love SWT)

It’s no secret that while Java possess probably the most widely distributed, cross-platform, and common user interface libraries, graphical Java applications on the whole simply stand out for the wrong reasons. Whether the GUI comes in the form of the Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) or Swing, each can be far from pretty and often do not mesh well with the platform they are being run on. For instance, running an AWT or Swing application can be an almost alien experience, no matter what operating system you are using, because neither uses the native control widgets.